ASSESSMENT THREE – SMALL NEWSROOMS INNOVATING IN BIG WAYS

Technological advancement, new competitors and audiences who want content accessible whenever and wherever they require across multiple platforms, has made it extremely vital for newsrooms to be innovative in new and creative ways. In journalism this year major newsrooms have been taking risks and experimenting with the latest technology and storytelling platforms. These experiments were highlighted in the Trends in Newsrooms report. But this report also highlighted the fact that these news outlets such as the The New York Times, BBC and The Guardian have the resources in their hands.

The report released by WAN-IFRA looked beyond these large outlets and gave a spotlight to smaller newsrooms that are also innovating in big ways and engaging in experimental storytelling. Brian Veseling, WAN-IFRA’s senior editor, states that “Frequently, stories about innovation focus on developments from publishers such as The New York Times and The Guardian, and while these companies have an amazing record of achievement, there are many other news publishers around the world who are also undertaking efforts to inform and engage their audiences in new and intriguing ways.”

Below are some smaller outlets in which have ignored their size and achieved success in thinking outside the box and being creatively inventive.

VietnamPlus, in Vietnam used the art of rap to draw in the attention of a younger audience. The news anchors at this outlet rap the news of the day set to hip-hop music. Editor-in-chief stated that it took some convincing to get the newsroom management to agree to the idea, but it obviously paid off as the initial video released gained 1 million views after being online for only 48 hours. RapNews is now a regular part of this newsroom and a youtube channel RapNewsPlus is completely dedicated to the segment.

The newspaper Mawbima in Sri Lanka used it’s paper to tackle and bring recognition to a major health problem. Dengue fever infected close to 46,000 people in 2014 and in order to help with the spread of this deadly disease, the paper imprinted it’s pages with mosquito repellent. Mawbima found that mixing citronella essence, which repels mosquitos, with ink, the paper itself would stop mosquitos biting. The paper also ran articles on how to prevent dengue and gave mosquito repellent patches to schoolchildren.

De Morgen, a Flemish daily newspaper has been applauded for experimenting with the visual layout of their paper in order to set them apart from competitors. The paper focuses on a visually appealing layout to present their content in an interesting way. The format of the newspaper was changed from Broadsheet to Berlin which introduced a very modern and unique page-layout. Innovative ideas can been seen throughout the entire paper. De Morgen creates a youthful, positive and future-orientated image and was named one of the four newspapers in the world with the best design from the Society for News Design.

Innovation isn’t just about using new technology to engage audiences, but creatively incorporating new ideas and ways shake up the usual ways of the newsroom or paper in order to gain attention and appreciation from a wider audience.

WEEKLY MODULES

WEEK ONE: CONTEMPRARY JOURNALISM IN MULTIMEDIA

WEEK TWO: PERSON AND PLACE

WEEK THREE: REASON FOR PERSON AND PLACE

For the assessment on a person and place I have chosen Robyn Lambe, my mother and her connection to her childhood home, the home that was also a huge part of my own childhood.

I chose to do my mother as I wanted to delve deeper into her experiences at the house and to grasp her connection to the place, as I was already aware of my own.

In my audio story, through the use of images and sounds, I hope to communicate some of my mum’s most cherished memories and the things she learned growing up in a small town and in a house that was respected greatly within the community.

WEEK FIVE:

PART ONE- CRITIQUE OF PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT

The former student who composed the audio piece ‘An Artist and Her Garden’ provided a very peaceful and soothing piece that allowed you to really grasp the feeling the woman has toward her garden through the music and meaningful dialogue. The main background track ‘To Build A Home by The Cinematic Orchestra’ was very fitting as the lady states that without her garden she would not have felt comfortable or at home. Overall this was a very enticing piece and was very effective in the way the ambient sounds were perfectly timed and placed in order to contribute to the meaning behind the woman’s story. It makes you feel as though you are in the garden.

PART TWO- AUDIO RECORDING WITH A SMARTPHONE

Along with the advancement of technology, comes smartphones and along with smartphones comes the convenience to capture quality sounds. There are several apps available that can help increase the quality of your audio recordings, they can also help make it easier to send the recordings to your computer so that you can load it on to programs such as Hindenburg. Some of the most popular apps include:

iTalk Griffin

Smart voice recorder

Tape-A-Talk

Easy Voice Recorder

If you combine an external microphone and one of these apps together, it will take the quality of your recordings one step further. An external microphone that simply plugs into your smartphone will allow you to produce more high quality sounds and to capture long distance sounds. An example of a device such as this would be the ‘Audio Technica Mono Electret Condenser Lapel Microphone’.

WEEK SEVEN: INSPIRATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS

WEEK TEN: ANALYSING JOURNALISTS USE OF TWITTER

WEEK TWELVE: CRITIQUE OF ‘MEDIUM SOY LATTE PLEASE’

ASSESSMENT TWO – WHAT IS HIDDEN

THE RIGHT TO LOVE AND COMMIT

Marriage is something that many couples aspire to when they are ready to make a commitment to spend the rest of their life with someone that they love. But unfortunately for this beautiful Australian couple, it can’t happen right now. A dominant argument against same-sex marriage is that marriage is suppose to be about procreation and a promise that children will have the support of both a mother and a father, yet marriage is not denied to heterosexuals who cannot or will not reproduce, nor is it any longer forbidden to divorce or refuse to recognise the right of unmarried women to raise children. After being exposed to this family, I’ve realised that it’s not about being raised by a mother or a father, it’s about being raised by figures who love and support every part of you and who motivate you to be the best you can be. It’s about being raised by people who teach you the importance of kindness, gratitude, humility, perseverance and responsibility, which is exactly what this couple have done for their children together. They want to be able to show their kids that their relationship matters and that they are completely committed to each other for the rest of their lives. Having the privilege to be apart of this families life has allowed me to realise that what’s hidden behind the door of this family household, and behind these two strong and ambitious women’s relationship is an intelligent, vibrant, kind and accepting family and two very well trained pooches.

Failure to recognise the love and commitment of all justifies that it is acceptable to discriminate on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender. While Australia currently allows same sex couples to enter civil unions, this should not be viewed as full equality. This union does not propose the legal equity that comes along with a marriage, nor does it offer the same social acceptance or status. The marriage act within Australia currently defines marriage as being between a man and a woman, but its time for it to be defined as simply a union between two people regardless of race, gender, religion or sexuality. Marriage is a basic civil right that should be allowed to everyone, regardless of who they are and who they love.

For some people, a child hood home is where they have the fondest memories and it is where they learnt about values, morals and their culture. Revisiting some beloved memories, Robyn Lambe gives an insight into one of the places she has always cherished most, this being the home she and her large family grew up in. Robyn talks about what she learnt and gained from growing up in a small town, and having a home that was a respected place within the community.